Trust Me, Having a Mental Illness Isn’t Fashionable

A wall mural of a woman whose face is separated

I lived most of my life in shame of who I was — diagnosed with conditions I’d never share even with some of my closest friends. Labels I’d never dare think about wearing across my chest or around my neck out of embarrassment. But now, these same labels I avoided for years have become *deep inhale* A FASHION STATEMENT! *sharp exhale* What in the world has changed?

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Unable to Take a Compliment? Here’s Why…

a deflated yellow smiley balloon on the street

My husband and I spent last weekend with our families. On our way out the door from my parents’ house my mom complimented my new blazer.

“This thing?” I said about a blazer I had been eyeing for months, saved for, and finally splurged on after refreshing the retailer’s site 722 times over Labor Day weekend in hopes of my size restocking.

“It’s not that nice. It’s too heavy. And shorter than I thought it would be. And it was on sale,” I said, listing its flaws.

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Why Other People’s Accomplishments Sometimes Make You Feel Terrible

woman standing in front of waterfall holding sign that says i'm here not you

Have you ever become spiteful after hearing about someone else’s accomplishments, and felt like a complete jerk? Maybe you’ve felt your heart sink a little bit when someone shares their own good news in the form of an “I’m so excited to announce…” Facebook or Instagram post. Chances are, yes, you’ve felt a little terrible at least once when you’ve watched someone’s success from the sidelines. You find yourself looking at your phone, feeling like a failure, even though you’re not!

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What’s It Like to Lose Someone to Suicide?

A person looks outside a hole in the wall

My adult life could be easily divided into two very distinct segments: BAD (before Adam died) and AAD (after Adam died). To anyone who doesn’t know me or Adam, that may sound a bit dramatic; I was only 24 when he died, which is a very early age to have your life virtually divided in half. But his death had a profound effect on me.

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Do Things Truly Get Better When You Come Out as LGBTQ?

a woman with black nail polish holds rainbow candles

Coming out is the process of acknowledging both internally and socially that you are LGBTQ.

Unfortunately, we live in a world in which “coming out” is still demanded of LGBTQ folks, as heterosexuality is seen as the default (read: normal) sexuality. As a result, we often push people to come out, especially publicly.

Let’s explore some of the nuances of coming out, and how this important step in an LGBTQ individual’s life can be both beneficial and challenging.

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Why World Mental Health Day 2018 is Especially Important

A group of teenagers talks in a circle

Today is World Mental Health Day, an opportunity for organizations and individuals around the globe to bring awareness to mental health and surrounding challenges.

Each year, the World Federation For Mental Health (WFMH) selects a theme that facilitates discussion around a growing mental health epidemic or challenge. This year’s theme is “Young People and Mental Health in a Changing World.”

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How to Help Someone Who is Avoidant of Their Mental Illness

A woman lies on her bed surrounded by photos, while covering her face

Often in therapy, clients come in prepared to discuss a single issue, and one that’s relatively minor in their eyes. However, it can quickly become evident they are struggling with severe mental health issues they likely aren’t aware of.

Relatedly, people may come in with a family member or partner who urges them to get help for a specific issue, but the client is defensive about the very idea of having this issue.

To better assist those we feel should seek help for mental illness, it helps to understand common examples where the potential client may not understand our concern for them.

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What is the Myers-Briggs Personality Test (and How To Take It)?

Taking a multiple choice test

Have you ever overheard a friend or coworker declare “I’m an INFJ!” or another seemingly random four-letter combination? It’s likely they’re talking about their Myers-Briggs test results.

This personality-related test was developed in the 1940’s, yet continues to be discussed and applied in modern instances. Why has it become so popular over the years, and how can you take the test yourself? Answers below!

What is the Myers-Briggs Test?

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is a personality test, typically based on psychological attributes and is used to determine differing strengths and types of personalities in a workplace or other setting. The questionnaire’s battery of tests can provide insight into the subject’s perception, decision making, leadership skills, and other attributes may contribute to personal or professional success.

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What is Hypochondria and How to Get Help?

A doctor checks a patient's blood pressure, surrounded by medical implements

For most people, a sneeze is just a sneeze. But for hypochondriacs, a sneeze can have much bigger implications, making them fear it’s a sign they have a horrible disease.

Put simply, a hypochondriac is an individual who lives with the fear that they have a serious but undiagnosed medical condition — even when diagnostic tests from professionals show there is nothing wrong.

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Can Anxiety Make You Depressed (or Vice Versa)?

A rogue potato tries to escape into the tomato bin

Anxiety and depression are intricately linked, which is why the same types of therapy and the same classes of medications are often used to treat both disorders.

In my practice, I have noticed that many clients that have self-diagnosed as depressed are actually experiencing anxiety. Similarly, many clients who identify as anxious are often depressed. Here, I will explain the connections between anxiety and depression, and why one can lead to the other.

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