Are There Good Reasons for Your Bad Feelings: Interview with Randolph M. Nesse

Randolph M. Nesse

Our relationship with mental health is typically based on challenges we’re currently experiencing — but what if our current issues are rooted in the distant past? Often overlooked is the fact that our predispositions for conditions like depression and anxiety have existed for millenia. From an evolutionary standpoint, why haven’t these detrimental traits and behaviors been filtered out and how might they affect us now?

Randolph M. Nesse, MD, a founder of the field of evolutionary medicine and author of recently-published Good Reasons for Bad Feelings, helped us understand the gap between human physiology and modern environment, and how we can apply this field for better therapy outcomes. Continue reading Are There Good Reasons for Your Bad Feelings: Interview with Randolph M. Nesse

The Global Mental Healthcare Epidemic Demands an Urgent Paradigm Shift

Sigmund Freud

We are living in the midst of a mental health crisis — in the U.S. and across the globe. According to the World Health Organization, depression affects nearly 15 percent of adults worldwide, and diagnoses have risen 33% since 2013, according to a report from health insurer Blue Cross Blue ShieldResearchers Aaron Reuben and Jonathan Schaefer even recently proved that we are all more likely to experience a bout of mental illness in our lives than we are to develop diabetes, heart disease or any kind of cancer.

As a leader of Talkspace, a behavioral health company that has provided 1 million people psychotherapy over the last 6 years, I have been relentlessly exposed to and concerned by the complexity of the problem. Clinical, technological, regulatory, cultural, and above all, human issues are involved, and the current systems designed to deal with it are failing. The rate of failure across different systems is accelerating. Continue reading The Global Mental Healthcare Epidemic Demands an Urgent Paradigm Shift

Breaking C-Suite Stigma: Our Interview with Jason Saltzman, CEO of Alley

Jason Saltzman sitting on stairs

With more leaders and athletes going public with their mental health stories, it’s an important reminder that mental health issues affect a broad spectrum of people, from all backgrounds.

At a recent conference hosted by Talkspace, world-champion swimmer Michael Phelps described feeling like an “animal in a zoo,” referring to his mental state while under the intense spotlight of performance. And he’s right: We tend to place celebrities, athletes, and those in the C-suite on an almost mythical level. But they are people, with real challenges, who are entitled to the same compassion we expect from our own support networks.

We recently sat down with Jason Saltzman, CEO and founder of co-working community Alley. Jason has used his platform as a successful entrepreneur to advocate for openness about mental health in the workplace, the technology sector, and beyond.

Below he shares his journey with general anxiety disorder, and how it’s made him a more compassionate person and leader.

Continue reading Breaking C-Suite Stigma: Our Interview with Jason Saltzman, CEO of Alley

This Year, Try an Unresolution

A tiara that says "happy new year" sits on a drab deck

“Have you considered not setting any New Year’s resolutions this year?” my therapist asked me.

Was she serious? This was back in 2013 when my whole identity was tied to being an overachiever. At the time, setting New Year’s resolutions felt essential to my future happiness. It didn’t matter if my goals ended up making me feel bad about myself. The important part was I had the self-discipline to achieve them. Continue reading This Year, Try an Unresolution

3 Ways to Make the Good Parts of the Holidays Last All Year

Two women meet a Santa under a California pier

The holiday season is a special time of year. Many people are celebrating both religious and cultural holidays in a concentrated few weeks. These celebrations help promote the “holiday spirit” where we often honor some of our most sacred values. But what if you could make the good parts of the holidays last all year long?

You can!

While there is no one way to celebrate the holiday season, here are some suggestions that overlap different traditions and cultures that you may want to incorporate in the coming year. Continue reading 3 Ways to Make the Good Parts of the Holidays Last All Year

How to Survive the Holidays With Your Partner’s Family

A man dances with a family member

Some people are lucky enough to love their in-laws. For everyone else, getting through the holidays with your partner’s family is a feat akin to tightrope walking without a net. From passive aggressive sisters-in-law, to uncles who make comments about your personality, there are potentially infinite ways for in-laws to offend you — potentially ruin your holiday season.

Thankfully, there are healthy ways to cope. Here are five tips and tricks to help you survive the holidays without a major blow-up.

Continue reading How to Survive the Holidays With Your Partner’s Family

What Gratitude Does to Your Brain

Praying hands

When it comes to Thanksgiving traditions, my family does not hold back. From our morning brunch, to afternoon disc golf, to folding napkins into turkeys set around the dinner table, we love our annual traditions.

Last year we tried something new. We wrote notes to each present family member with what we appreciate about them and took turns reading the notes aloud. There were laughs, there were tears, and most of all, there was a deep sense of gratitude. This may be our best tradition yet. Continue reading What Gratitude Does to Your Brain

Conference Recap – Mental Health and Young Americans: Breakdown or Breakthrough

Talkspace CEO Oren Frank speaks with Michael Phelps

We can all agree that being a teenager has always been tough. Hormones are changing, social anxiety has kicked into high gear, and peer pressure is exerting itself from every angle.

But teens today are facing unique challenges. From social media addiction to social isolation, vaping to the opioid epidemic, cyberbullying to gun violence, Gen Z-ers are coming of age in a whole new world. Most concerning, it’s showing up in their mental health.

Continue reading Conference Recap – Mental Health and Young Americans: Breakdown or Breakthrough