3 Ways City Living Increases Your Anxiety

Times Square New York City

Many are drawn to big cities for their vibrant culture and promise of better career opportunities — just ask the 80 percent of the U.S. population that lives in an urban area. And while the allure of “city lights” can both inspire and provide an escape from the monotony of more rural environments, the constant crowds, congestion, and noise can actually trigger and worsen a person’s anxiety.

It is widely understood that many who live in a city experience daily stress, such as public transportation issues and rapidly rising rent costs, but research reveals the stress of urban living is more than just a daily annoyance — it significantly impacts a person’s mental health. So what is it about the city that makes a person’s anxiety spike?

There are three primary ways.

Continue reading 3 Ways City Living Increases Your Anxiety

3 Simple Ways to Bust Out of a Summer “Funk”

A plastic flamingo in the sand

It seems almost everyone talks about how depressed they feel during short, dark winter days, but very few people discuss feeling down during in the summer. Even though your friends may not talk about it as openly, plenty of people experience a funk in the warmer months as well. Fortunately, there are ways to cope with feelings of sadness, loneliness, or depression that strike in the summer.

For those who feel lonely or isolated, the summer can feel like a time when everyone else is having fun. It seems like everyone except you is hosting or being invited to pool parties and barbecues, using vacation time to travel to exotic destinations, or meeting new people to date.

Of course, this is rarely the case, just as it isn’t the case during the rest of the year. In the summer, though, social activities are much more visible, because they often occur outside and are blasted across social media. This can make people who are already anxious about their social lives feel left out and friendless.

Continue reading 3 Simple Ways to Bust Out of a Summer “Funk”

Why Do You Constantly Reach For Your Phone?

Man on bench looks at smartphone hunched over

Whether you’re waiting for a train, commercials to end or the oven to finish preheating, you likely kill those brief moments by mindlessly scrolling or swiping across your phone screen. You’re not alone in this new normal. During our day-to-day lives, most of us live with our cell phones perpetually within close reach — mostly to Google a dinner spot, text a friend, or scroll through Instagram. But those who constantly reach for their smartphones might be doing so due to anxiety or depression.

Continue reading Why Do You Constantly Reach For Your Phone?

How Modern Life Causes Anxiety (and What to do About It)

People on their phones at the train station

While there’s plenty about modern life that makes our day-to-day easier, there’s also a lot of aspects that can cause and perpetuate anxiety. Sure, we’ve got a world of information and thousands of apps at our fingertips, but is that really a good thing? Did people in the olden days, in a way, have it easier than we do? I mean, anxiety was a thing in 400 BC, just ask Hippocrates. But did the ancient Greeks have to deal with Instagram or deciphering cryptic text messages (or lack thereof) from a someone he went on a date with last night? Nope.

Here are some common modern life stressors — and more importantly, what you can do to cope with them.

Continue reading How Modern Life Causes Anxiety (and What to do About It)

The Upside to Anxiety: 3 Reasons Why Anxiety is Actually Good for You

Woman in park smiling slightly

Most of us can recall moments of anxiety where our chests tightened, our pulses raced, and fear washed over us. For those suffering from anxiety disorders — the most common mental illness in the U.S. — these symptoms pale in comparison to the hyperventilation, dizziness, and extreme panic associated with chronic anxiety.

The U.S. has been unceremoniously dubbed the most anxious nation on Earth, and anxiety sufferers on all ends of the spectrum work diligently to ward off these negative experiences. But is anxiety always bad?

The quick answer: It depends.

Situational feelings of anxiety — not chronic anxiety — can actually be good for you. Here’s why…

Continue reading The Upside to Anxiety: 3 Reasons Why Anxiety is Actually Good for You

This Viral Tweet Is Helping Couples Support Each Other During Anxiety Attacks

Couple laughing and holding each other

This Viral Tweet Is Helping Couples Support Each Other During Anxiety Attacks” originally appeared on Fairy God Boss, an advice blog that makes it easier for you to take care of yourself.


Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the United States, affecting 40 million adults ages 18 and older every year — that’s 18.1 percent of the population. Anxiety develops from a complex set of risk factors, including genetics, brain chemistry, personality and life events, and people with anxiety disorders are three to five times more likely to go to the doctor and six times more likely to be hospitalized for psychiatric disorders than those who do not suffer. But only 36.9 percent of those who deal with it receive treatment and, even for those who do, dealing with their anxiety is no easy feat. For couples, anxiety disorders can cause conflicts if they don’t communicate well.

Continue reading This Viral Tweet Is Helping Couples Support Each Other During Anxiety Attacks

Are You Hiding Anxiety Behind These Behaviors?

Man looking at reflection in window

Anxiety can be a nebulous emotion. Sometimes it’s obvious you’re worrying — even Doctor Obvious could diagnose you if you’re spending four sleepless hours each night fretting over your big move. But sufferers of generalized anxiety might not be able to identify obvious triggers or realize some of their worst habits stem from the stress. You may recognize your odd, changing behavior, but you can’t identify why — and the uncertainty only creates more stress.

Here are six behaviors that signal that your anxiety needs more attention, or even the help of a professional therapist.

Continue reading Are You Hiding Anxiety Behind These Behaviors?

Sensory Deprivation: How Floating in the Dark Eased My Anxiety

Woman floating in water

What the hell am I gonna do in a pitch black chamber for an hour with literally nothing but myself and 10 inches of water?

This is all I could think right after committing to an hour-long sensory deprivation session. I’m fine with being alone — but without my iPhone, a book, or vision? What was I going to do? How would I shut my mind off? Anytime I try to meditate, I hyperventilate, and I’m not a fan of stillness or deep breathing exercises. I found myself becoming anxious at the thought of … something that is supposed to bring me complete and utter relaxation. The irony.

Continue reading Sensory Deprivation: How Floating in the Dark Eased My Anxiety

Is Marijuana Good for Treating Your Anxiety?

woman rolling a marijuana joint

I was 18 the first time I smoked weed. Unlike most other pot-smoking 18 year olds, I did it for medicinal purposes — honestly! In fact, I was very anti-weed, and admittedly, judgy towards people who smoked. The year prior, I was the vice president of the Students Against Destructive Decisions club at my school.

However, desperate times called for desperate measures. My anxiety was at an all-time high during my freshman year in college. I had trouble adjusting (to say the least). I came home almost every weekend to try to seek solace in my comfort zone. But my stress level was so horrible that even being home couldn’t help.

Continue reading Is Marijuana Good for Treating Your Anxiety?