What Is “Good” Mental Health?

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It’s typically easy to recognize “problematic” mental health — most of the time we know how to recognize anxiety, depression, stress, conflict…the list goes on. When we strive for good mental health, however, it’s a little harder to figure out exactly what that means.

What is good mental health, and how do we know when we’ve got it? Everything you need to know can be found below. Continue reading What Is “Good” Mental Health?

4 Vital Tips for Parenting With Depression

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If you have children, you know raising kids presents challenges on your best days. Parents with mental illness, however, have it even harder.

In particular, parental depression can wreak havoc on a child’s psyche. What’s worse, when children develop problems related to parental depression, the added stress can make that parent’s depression worse. Thus, parental depression can turn into a long-lasting cycle of negative outcomes for the entire family.

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Orthorexia: When Healthy Eating Gets Unhealthy

Plain bowl of lettuce

Often, it feels like every time we turn around, there’s a new diet fad, exercise craze, or best-selling book proclaiming itself to be the key to health.

Unfortunately, as Western society increasingly prioritizes clean eating, physical exercise, and other forms of “healthy living,” clinicians have seen another trend: orthorexia.

A relatively new term, orthorexia is still taking shape as a concept, and is not yet mentioned in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The original definition by doctor Steven Bratman and writer David Knight described orthorexia as an obsession with proper nutrition, dietary restrictions, and specific food preparation methods.

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Male Survivors of Sexual Assault Face Unique Challenges to Recovery

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According to a Center for Disease Control (CDC) National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, one in six U.S. men have experienced sexual violence, and 17% of those men develop symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In my years practicing therapy, I’ve found male survivors face unique challenges to recovery, yet hesitate to get the help they need.

The question is why.

For one, we don’t hear much about male sexual assault survivors, although one study found sexual assault history was common among both women and men, reported by 25% of women and 16% of men surveyed. The research participants also faced similar long-term problems, regardless of gender.

Continue reading Male Survivors of Sexual Assault Face Unique Challenges to Recovery