What To Do If You Don’t Approve Of Your Friend’s Partner

Odd couple

Your friend met a new guy, and she’s head over heels about him. He’s all she talks about, and she’s over the moon to have met him. You, as her friend, are happy for her — until, that is, you meet him. You want to scream “You can do so much better!” because you know this guy isn’t worthy of her time. But, the question is, should you? We can’t choose who our friends date, so is it worth speaking up?

For the sake of your friendship, it’s best to give the new partner a chance (or two… or three…), after all, your friend sees something in him or her, and the new partner could be nervous or slow to warm up. But if something still feels off, you might want to share what’s on your mind. Continue reading What To Do If You Don’t Approve Of Your Friend’s Partner

Tidying Up: What Cleanliness Says About Your Mental Health

Cluttered closet

One of the things I’ve always admired about myself is that sometimes my behavior, when overly stressed or anxious, can feel beneficial. A few minutes to whisk the vacuum across the living room floor, and it’s like I meditated; give me a sponge and a grimy bathroom, and I’ll give you shine and calm.

Looking at a spotless and tidy home, whatever’s bothering me feels temporarily paused. Cleanliness translates to lower stress and anxiety for me — and a flawless home for my family growing up, my roommates in college, and my husband now — how lucky are they? Continue reading Tidying Up: What Cleanliness Says About Your Mental Health

How Mental Health Counselors Help Change Your Life

A male counselor talks to a couple

Many people have the misconception that a counselor is only for people with serious mental health issues — and if nothing is absolutely “broken,” then counseling isn’t for them. This simply isn’t true, however — you don’t have to be diagnosed with a mental health issue to benefit from seeing a counselor. Many people seek help for everyday concerns: relationship problems, job stress, self-doubt, or help achieving their goals. Others turn to counselors during difficult times, such as for grief after a death or divorce.

While seeking professional help from a counselor is obviously valuable in intense, overwhelming, or complicated situations, it’s also an incredibly beneficial tool to help build positive mental health habits — even if nothing is “wrong.” Having this preventative care mindset can help you keep your emotional well-being top of mind and process your concerns before they become problems. Continue reading How Mental Health Counselors Help Change Your Life

6 Questions You Need to Ask Before Committing to Someone

Couple holding each other

After countless swipes left and right (mostly left), blind dates, speed dates, awkward dates, always-only-first dates, you’ve met someone you think is wonderful — and he or she seems to think you’re wonderful back. Eventually, neither of you wants to live without each other, so you’re ready to go all in and make a firm commitment.

This is exciting, but it can also be terrifying. After all, finding and committing to the right partner is one of the most important decisions you’ll make in your lifetime. To make sure you don’t lose yourself in the butterflies and giddiness — and instead create a foundation that’s grounded in an understanding that will guide you and your partner throughout your relationship — it’s essential to ask your partner and yourself some questions before taking the next step. Continue reading 6 Questions You Need to Ask Before Committing to Someone

7 Ways You Can Help Raise Mental Health Awareness

three happy people

Millions of Americans are affected by mental health conditions every year. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. — 43.8 million, or 18.5 percent — experiences mental illness in a given year; and we know this is increasingly an issue with America’s youth.

While there are effective treatments available, many individuals with known mental health issues never seek help from a professional due to stigma, discrimination, a lack of resources, or a combination of all three. Even if you don’t struggle with mental illness, you have the opportunity to inspire others to raise awareness and take part in the sharing of information, tools, and support for mental health issues. You can make a legitimate difference and help change the narrative from negative to one of positive affirmation. Continue reading 7 Ways You Can Help Raise Mental Health Awareness

Are You Contributing to Other People’s Mental Health Issues?

Hands pulling against woman's face

You may wonder: Is your mental health dependent on your neighbor’s (and vice versa)? In some ways, yes — there is, in a way, a mental health ripple effect.

Just as when a pebble is thrown into water and causes ripples, your words, actions, and feelings affect those around you, who in turn affect those around them, and so on. Continue reading Are You Contributing to Other People’s Mental Health Issues?

How to Be Brave About Your Mental Health

Lion lying down

Talking about intimate experiences, of any type, is tough. You’re being vulnerable, unsure of your audience’s reaction, worried about oversharing or making your audience uncomfortable. But to end the stigma surrounding mental health, those with mental health issues are being encouraged to be more honest and brave, and open up about their mental health needs.

This kind of transparency can help remove the taboos and stigma associated with mental health and make society more comfortable talking about it. After all, when it comes to physical wellness, we understand that health is a broad spectrum. Some people wear glasses. Some have bad knees. Why not be as open about our mental health and the conditions associated with that? Why feel ashamed? Continue reading How to Be Brave About Your Mental Health

How to Tell if You’re “Clingy” and What to Do About it

Koala hanging from tree

When it comes to a new relationship, some love the chase, others find it exhausting. Once it’s more solidified, some enjoy spending every free moment with their partner, others need their space.

Figuring out how to act from day one in a relationship isn’t easy — do you text again or give him space? Do you see him on Friday and Saturday or figure he needs a night off? Is it normal to analyze his social media activity or are you inching toward obsessive danger? Continue reading How to Tell if You’re “Clingy” and What to Do About it

How to Go on Dates When You’re Anxious

Couple sitting inside restaurant with foggy windows

Dating is anxiety-provoking regardless of whether you have an anxiety disorder or not. You’re starting a new relationship, spending time with a stranger, opening yourself up to someone new — it can be frightening for even the most secure of people.

But, if you have an anxiety disorder, the anxiety that comes with dating and going on dates can be overwhelming. On a day-to-day basis you’re plagued with fears you’ll make a fool of yourself in front of someone, and now you’re at risk of being in an uncomfortable position in front of someone you want to like you. It’s something out of a nightmare. Continue reading How to Go on Dates When You’re Anxious

3 Signs that Self-Doubt is Getting in Your Way

Nervous Monkey

At home, I’m the ideas woman. I’m full of suggestions to improve my house, streamline my schedule, and make sure I’m making the most of every ounce of free time I have. I watch Shark Tank and throw my hands in the air — you call those innovations? I’m full of ideas for better ones.

But at work, in an environment that urges workers to “fail fast, fail often,” I mostly sit silently in meetings. “I’m sure someone has already thought of this,” I think when fresh ideas come to mind. “If it was a good idea, we’d already be doing it…” It’s an ever present self-doubt that keeps me from voicing my thoughts. Continue reading 3 Signs that Self-Doubt is Getting in Your Way