Why Successful People Struggle with Mental Illness

actor jim carrey wearing dark glasses

It doesn’t take long to assemble an impressive list of successful people who also struggle with mental illness. Comedian/actor Jim Carrey experienced clinical depression, Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling also combatted depression, entrepreneur/business mogul/founder of CNN Ted Turner lives with bipolar disorder, accomplished athlete Herschel Walker revealed he has dissociative identity disorder, and Brian Wilson of Beach Boys fame has been diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder.

Continue reading Why Successful People Struggle with Mental Illness

What to Do if You ‘Lose It’ at Work

man in business suit crying

It’s no wonder that work stresses so many of us out. Americans work longer hours with less vacation time than anyone in the developed world. This can make it difficult to balance work life with family life, friendships, and your own emotional and physical self-care.

For some of us, this stress can take a real toll on our performance at work, and when stress reaches a breaking point, some of us are apt to “lose it” — perhaps lashing out at colleagues, acting unreasonably, or losing our tempers.

Continue reading What to Do if You ‘Lose It’ at Work

4 Ways to Support Your Mental Health While Unemployed

A mug that says "Go Get 'Em" next to a plant and notebook

Losing a job — or even leaving one voluntarily — can take a huge toll on your mental health. First and foremost is the stress and worry about how you will stay afloat financially. Your daily routine also gets thrown off, and your self-esteem and identity might take a hit as well. And if you have family or a spouse to support, it can be easy to fall into the trap of guilt and shame over the inability to provide income in the short-term.

Unemployment means living with an uncertain future, and this alone can trigger depression and anxiety in many of us. But you should know that almost all of us have been there at one time or another, and you are not alone. Most importantly, there are actionable things you can do to protect your mental health.

Continue reading 4 Ways to Support Your Mental Health While Unemployed

How Marginalized People Can Overcome Imposter Syndrome

Woman at coffee shop with laptop

Studies show it, anecdotes illustrate it, and entire movements are built around it: When it comes to professional and even personal success, historically marginalized people — women, racial minorities, sexual minorities, people with disabilities, and others — are judged negatively for their strengths.

Whether it’s women being punished for academic success or people of color being judged less competent than their less-qualified white peers, discrimination continues to hamper us, from the classroom to the boardroom.

Continue reading How Marginalized People Can Overcome Imposter Syndrome

How Successful People Handle 3 Types of Toxic Coworkers

Young African-American woman works at desk in airy office space

How Successful People Handle 3 Types of Toxic Coworkers” originally appeared on Fairygodboss, an online career community for women, by women. 

Every workplace is filled interesting personalities —including frustrating ones.

If you feel like you’re surrounded by difficult people at the office — perhaps people who talk too much or a micromanaging boss — take heart, because you’re not alone. Studies have found that one in eight people leave a job due to problems with co-workers.

Since we spend more time at work than at home (and quitting tomorrow isn’t an option for most people), it’s worthwhile to figure out ways to get along.

Continue reading How Successful People Handle 3 Types of Toxic Coworkers

How to Know If a Company Will Be a Good Place for Your Mental Health

Young handsome man with coffee

Working while living with a mental health condition is often difficult. While some companies are becoming more aware of the importance of workplace mental health, not all employers are accommodating. It takes a lot of time and energy to apply for a new job, and it is deflating to start a new job only to find out the environment is not conducive to your mental health and well-being.

Perhaps the duties of the position are more demanding than what was initially expected, the hours are excessively long, or there is no HR support. To prevent this situation, job seekers can prioritize finding an employer that cares about mental health. Here’s how.

Continue reading How to Know If a Company Will Be a Good Place for Your Mental Health

Should You Disclose a Mental Illness During the Hiring Process?

man interviewing disclose mental illness during interview

I run around my apartment a little out of sorts, throwing random items of clothing into an overnight bag. From reading the hospital’s website, I know I can’t bring anything with drawstrings, but I throw my green hoodie in the bag anyway. I can’t imagine being without it.

My packing done and my hospital check-in time set, I’m not sure what else to do with myself on a Friday afternoon. I haven’t been to work in three days, but I guess I should inform them what’s happening. I hop in the car and fly over to the office to catch up on a few hours of work before being locked in a mental hospital for a week or to officially ask my boss for more time off, or…I don’t know what I was thinking. I was clearly in a paranoid, panicked, mentally ill state.

Continue reading Should You Disclose a Mental Illness During the Hiring Process?

How Staying in a Job You Hate Affects Your Mental Health

man with head in hands across from boss

When it comes to your career, there is nothing worse than a job you hate, literally.

According to a University of Manchester study, having a “poor quality” job — a job you hate — is actually worse for your mental health than having no job at all. It may sound hard to believe until you’ve been there — hostile co-workers, a passive-aggressive boss, or mind-numbing assignments. Not to mention we often spend 40 or more hours a week invested in our job, and that’s a lot of time to spend in a bad situation.

For the 51% of Americans employed full-time who reported to Gallup in 2017 that they’re uninterested in their jobs and the 16% who dislike their workplace, staying at a job you hate is bad news for your mental health. Here’s why.

Continue reading How Staying in a Job You Hate Affects Your Mental Health

How to Address Your Mental Health During Hiring Season

young woman nervous during job interview

Networking and business cards. Cover letters and resumes. Applications and interviews. It all adds up to the same thing — job hunting.

If any of these concepts, say networking or interviewing, make your hair stand on end, you’re in good company. According to a 2013 study, 92 percent of Americans fear at least one part of the job interview process, whether that’s having the jitters, showing up late for the interview, or not knowing how to answer difficult questions. This doesn’t even cover the nail-biting anxiety of waiting for a return email or phone call after you’ve sent off yet another application or completed an interview.

Combine the normal job search stress with a mental health issue, and the task may seem impossible.

Continue reading How to Address Your Mental Health During Hiring Season

12