Should You Disclose a Mental Illness During the Hiring Process?

man interviewing disclose mental illness during interview

I run around my apartment a little out of sorts, throwing random items of clothing into an overnight bag. From reading the hospital’s website, I know I can’t bring anything with drawstrings, but I throw my green hoodie in the bag anyway. I can’t imagine being without it.

My packing done and my hospital check-in time set, I’m not sure what else to do with myself on a Friday afternoon. I haven’t been to work in three days, but I guess I should inform them what’s happening. I hop in the car and fly over to the office to catch up on a few hours of work before being locked in a mental hospital for a week or to officially ask my boss for more time off, or…I don’t know what I was thinking. I was clearly in a paranoid, panicked, mentally ill state.

Continue reading Should You Disclose a Mental Illness During the Hiring Process?

How Staying in a Job You Hate Affects Your Mental Health

man with head in hands across from boss

When it comes to your career, there is nothing worse than a job you hate, literally.

According to a University of Manchester study, having a “poor quality” job — a job you hate — is actually worse for your mental health than having no job at all. It may sound hard to believe until you’ve been there — hostile co-workers, a passive-aggressive boss, or mind-numbing assignments. Not to mention we often spend 40 or more hours a week invested in our job, and that’s a lot of time to spend in a bad situation.

For the 51% of Americans employed full-time who reported to Gallup in 2017 that they’re uninterested in their jobs and the 16% who dislike their workplace, staying at a job you hate is bad news for your mental health. Here’s why.

Continue reading How Staying in a Job You Hate Affects Your Mental Health

How to Address Your Mental Health During Hiring Season

young woman nervous during job interview

Networking and business cards. Cover letters and resumes. Applications and interviews. It all adds up to the same thing — job hunting.

If any of these concepts, say networking or interviewing, make your hair stand on end, you’re in good company. According to a 2013 study, 92 percent of Americans fear at least one part of the job interview process, whether that’s having the jitters, showing up late for the interview, or not knowing how to answer difficult questions. This doesn’t even cover the nail-biting anxiety of waiting for a return email or phone call after you’ve sent off yet another application or completed an interview.

Combine the normal job search stress with a mental health issue, and the task may seem impossible.

Continue reading How to Address Your Mental Health During Hiring Season

As Workplaces Discuss Sexual Harassment Prevention, Are They Neglecting Treatment?

female therapist holding folder comforting woman client

As Workplaces Discuss Sexual Harassment Prevention, Are They Neglecting Treatment?” originally appeared on Fairygodboss, an online career community for women, by women. 

In the wake of the #MeToo movement, workplaces across the country are discussing how to prevent sexual harassment and penalize guilty employees. But, like all national issues, it’s important to not only consider prevention, but also treatment for those already affected.

New research published in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology warns that sexual harassment at work is a “chronic problem” for women in the workplace — one that can cause lasting mental illness. Continue reading As Workplaces Discuss Sexual Harassment Prevention, Are They Neglecting Treatment?

9 Tips for Managing Gaps in Your Resume Due to Mental Illness

resume pen glasses on table

If you live with mental illness, there may be gaps in your resume where you had to take time off work. Sometimes those gaps can be months or even years long. Now you’re on the mend, and you’re looking to re-enter the job market. You’re worried though that those gaps will count against you.

Fortunately you can write a resume or cover letter that is honest about your gaps but still presents you in a positive light. Here’s how:

1. See The Gaps As A Good Thing

Don’t be so down on yourself about the gaps in your resume. When you took time off work to tackle your mental health, that showed that you were taking responsibility for your own well being. After all, you can’t be an effective employee if you’re coming in to work ill. Those gaps demonstrate you’re willing to overcome adversity and take personal responsibility. You can play these traits up in your resume to illustrate what a valuable employee you could be. Continue reading 9 Tips for Managing Gaps in Your Resume Due to Mental Illness

6 Ways to Deal With Your Narcissistic Boss

female employee at desk frustrated with male boss standing behind her

Narcissism, or Narcissistic Personality Disorder, is almost as hard to deal with in the workplace as it is in family or intimate relationships. The most difficult situation is when your boss is a narcissist, because not only are you forced into close contact with your boss every day, but you are dependent on them for your income.

When your boss is unpredictable, self-centered, and easily upset, you might develop something akin to a PTSD response when you go into work each day. You are terrified of being insulted, shamed in front of coworkers, overlooked for opportunities, or even fired. Fortunately, though, there are ways to deal with your narcissistic boss that may allow you to survive and even thrive at work. Continue reading 6 Ways to Deal With Your Narcissistic Boss

How Much Effort Do Women Put Into Coping With Sexual Harassment in a Day?

women at work uncomfortable with male co-worker touching her on arm

It’s that knot of anxiety in the pit of your stomach when you walk down the street. You step off the train, your bag in front of your breasts, flinching lest the next passerby brush you “accidentally-on-purpose.”

It’s never knowing whether your boss is leaning just a little too close.

It’s turning the music up loud so you don’t hear the catcallers, or turning down an invitation to a work outing because the coworker who’s going has a reputation for getting handsy when he’s drunk. Continue reading How Much Effort Do Women Put Into Coping With Sexual Harassment in a Day?

5 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Taking Time Off for Your Mental Health

stressed woman at work with coffee and laptop

Today’s working world is becoming increasingly demanding, and stress impacts nearly everyone at some point during their career. Nonetheless, if the occasional exhausting day has become your everyday experience, it may be a sign that you need to take a break from the 9 to 5. Most people need time to relax and destress, especially those of us coping with mental illness.

But how do you know if you need more than a night or a weekend off? If you’re unsure if what you’re feeling warrants a break beyond standard vacations, ask yourself these five questions. Continue reading 5 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Taking Time Off for Your Mental Health

Holiday Anxiety: 5 Tips for Surviving Office Holiday Parties

office holiday party employees celebrating

Braving crowded stores to find the perfect gifts, family gatherings with relatives from far flung places you see only once a year, busy irregular schedules and traveling and decorating and wrapping presents and preparing food, and, of course, don’t forget the office holiday party.

’Tis the season…to be anxious.

With all these holiday activities to worry about, for many people, an office party may seem like a blip on the radar, approached with a combination of obligation, resignation, and for some, maybe even a little excitement. But if you live with anxiety, work holiday parties are probably high on the list of seasonal stressors. And you’re definitely not alone. Continue reading Holiday Anxiety: 5 Tips for Surviving Office Holiday Parties

Sexual Harassment Is About Mental Health, Not Only the Workplace

sexual harassment illustration man touching woman shoulder

I remember being in a meeting at a company I used to work for where people were making jokes about a presentation on sexual harassment. None of it made sense to me, and I certainly wasn’t laughing. Why were they were joking about something so serious, chuckling about it, and doing so in front of their boss? Well, actually, he was cracking jokes too.

In what world is it appropriate to make light of harassment? I wondered what would happen if I was harassed while at the company. Would I be taken seriously if I decided to report it? Would they make jokes about me behind my back? Would I get fired? Luckily, I wasn’t sexually harassed on the job — but not everyone is so lucky. Continue reading Sexual Harassment Is About Mental Health, Not Only the Workplace