Dating a Man with Depression: What You Need to Know and Do

Man silhouetted looking out bedroom window

When you date a man with depression, it can become a struggle to maintain a relationship with him and protect your own mental health. The experience is not fundamentally different than dating someone without a mental illness, but there are issues that are more likely to arise.

By understanding these issues and knowing how to respond, you can support the man you love without threatening the relationship or your emotional wellbeing. Continue reading Dating a Man with Depression: What You Need to Know and Do

Postpartum Depression: A Quick Guide for Tired New Moms

postpartum depression mother newborn

Despite all the work mental health professionals have done to break down the stigma of postpartum depression, society keeps shoving a message in the face of a new mom: having a baby is the best thing in the world.

“Are you loving being a mom?”, “Isn’t it just the best thing ever?” and “Treasure this time” are all phrases a new mom will hear in the first weeks of her baby’s life. It can leave her wondering what she is missing, what she is doing wrong.

Well-meaning friends, family and ever-present social media can place pressure on new mothers. This can morph into a belief that if you are not loving your newborn who is screaming for no apparent reason, waking up ten times a night and pooping all over you, there must be something wrong with you. Add that pressure to the out-of-whack hormones coursing through a woman’s body and you have a recipe for postpartum depression. Continue reading Postpartum Depression: A Quick Guide for Tired New Moms

It’s Time to Screen All Pregnant Women for Depression

asian pregnant woman in hospital depression

We all know postpartum depression is a serious issue, but many people do not know about peripartum depression: symptoms of depression during pregnancy, especially in the weeks approaching birth.

Roughly one in five women experience an episode of depression during pregnancy or in the year after giving birth, according to a report by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [AHRQ]. About half of these women have “serious symptoms,” The New York Times reported.

The U.S. Preventative Services Task Force [USPSTF] issued a recommendation in The Journal of the American Medical Association that urges primary care doctors to implement depression screenings for pregnant women. These screenings will improve depression symptoms by encouraging women to proactively seek treatments such as psychotherapy, the USPSTF said. They involve questionnaires and scales designed to evaluate symptoms of depression. Continue reading It’s Time to Screen All Pregnant Women for Depression

5 Celebrities Who Battled Depression and Came Out Strong

Halle Berry depression

People with millions of dollars, academy awards, platinum albums or a ubiquitous name may have the “good life,” but that doesn’t mean they are happier. Celebrities are not immune to depression. Fame can actually make you more vulnerable to mental illness.

Fortunately, their stories of battling depression can be insightful and enlightening, at least for those of us who aren’t in the headlines every week. They show how celebrities are fundamentally the same as any other person who deals with mental health issues. Continue reading 5 Celebrities Who Battled Depression and Came Out Strong

Seasonal Affective Disorder [SAD]: Use this Infographic to Battle Depression

This infographic was originally published on the resources section of Yellowbrick, a national psychiatric center that specializes in treating young adults such as college students. 

There’s holiday blues, and then there’s seasonal affective disorder [SAD]. Check out the infographic below so you can understand the difference and help those in need, especially if one of those people is you.

Consider the Talkspace E-Gift Card as well, something guaranteed to combat SAD. But make sure you have the right conversation before you give it. Continue reading Seasonal Affective Disorder [SAD]: Use this Infographic to Battle Depression

Holiday Suicide is a Myth — And an Opportunity for Awareness

depressed woman christmas tree holiday

The popular notion of suicide rates spiking around the holidays is a myth, according to years of data the Center for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] collected. Suicides rates are actually lowest during December and peak in the spring. The media perpetuates this myth, but it isn’t the worst kind of lie.

Suicide awareness and prevention is a conversation we should be having during all seasons, so why not take advantage of the media’s holiday blues invention? It’s a chance to look out for the people we care about and be proactive rather than waiting until spring. Riding the wave of media coverage will allow you to reach more people via social media as well. Continue reading Holiday Suicide is a Myth — And an Opportunity for Awareness

Social Media For Good: 15 of the Best Tweets About Depression

Social Media For Good: 17 of the Best Tweets About Depression

Depression, one of the most common and most stigmatized mental disorders of them all, has had a rare moment in the spotlight this summer as Twitter users spoke out and banded together over the illness.

– by Molly Enking / Talkspace Social Media Manager

Their tweets offer a rare glimpse into the world of those who struggle with depression daily, but may not speak up – even to their loved ones.

Using the hashtags #TheWorstPartOfDepressionIs (trending August 7th), #MHDignityMarch (trending August 18th) and #EndTheStigma (used by most mental health organizations), users are bravely opening their hearts and minds to the Twittersphere—and promoting a conversation that very much needs to happen in this country. Continue reading Social Media For Good: 15 of the Best Tweets About Depression

Summertime Blues: Making Sense of Summer Depression Stemming from Seasonal Affective Disorder

Summertime Blues: Making Sense of Summer Depression Stemming from Seasonal Affective Disorder

Most of us have heard of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and associate it with the winter months. This makes sense since it’s dark and cold during that time of year. And though it is, indeed, more common to feel depressed during the winter, there’s more to SAD than simply that. Read on.

The days are longer, it’s warm and sunny, and everyone is relaxing and having fun. So then, how is it still possible to feel blue? Summer Depression resulting from Seasonal Affective Disorder is hard to wrap our minds around, and it’s mainly because of cognitive dissonance. Continue reading Summertime Blues: Making Sense of Summer Depression Stemming from Seasonal Affective Disorder

City Dwellers, Embrace the Healing Power of Nature

City Dwellers, Embrace the Healing Power of Nature

For whatever reason, it’s quite easy to forget that nature has the power to impact us in the same way any other living thing can.

Depending on who we are – hikers, bird-watchers, or devout city dwellers – a trip into the wilderness may present an opportunity to get in a hard workout, a glimpse at a rare breed of kingfisher or an attempt at an expedition where our survival skills (if any) are tested. Continue reading City Dwellers, Embrace the Healing Power of Nature

Are You Depressed, Or Is Something Else The Problem?

Are You Depressed, Or Is Something Else The Problem?

You may be depressed, but you could also be experiencing sorrow, grief, sadness, or a yearning for something you miss. Do you know how to tell the difference?

You’ve probably heard of this popular saying: Depression is anger turned inward. It means the anger that you may be holding within has nowhere to go – it simply festers inside. Just like undigested food can turn putrid, the anger can evolve into depression. You may feel lethargic and dull, uninterested in anything – including getting out of bed. You may find yourself crying, or being moody and irritable. Your sex drive may be reduced to nothing and you could be feeling suicidal. Continue reading Are You Depressed, Or Is Something Else The Problem?